What Is Intense Pulse Light (IPL) Hair Removal?

Millions of women, as well as men, have unwanted hair on their body. If this sounds familiar, you should consider intense pulse light (IPL) hair removal. It offers a safe and effective way to remove unwanted hair. As a result, it's become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional hair removal solutions like shaving and waxing. […]

What Happens to the Fat in CoolSculpting?

With the ability to remove 25% of all fat cells in the targeted area, CoolSculpting has become an increasingly popular fat-reduction procedure in recent years. Developed by ZELTIQ Aesthetics, it uses cold air to destroy problematic body fat.

Whether you're struggling with unwanted fat on your flanks, stomach or any of the other six areas approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), CoolSculpting could be the answer.

Before making the commitment, though, you might be wondering what happens to the fat in CoolSculpting.

How CoolSculpting Treats Fat

To better understand what happens to fat cells, you must first understand how CoolSculpting works. As a noninvasive procedure, it doesn't involve the surgical removal of fat. Rather, CoolSculpting works by exposing fat cells to cold air to induce localized death. When fat cells are exposed to cold air -- ranging from about 12.2 degrees to 41 degrees Fahrenheit -- they undergo a state of localized death. In other words, the fat cells begin to die.

CoolSculpting is designed to only induce localized death in fat cells and not muscle or skin cells. It's well-documented that fat cells are more susceptible to cold-related damage than muscle and skin cells.

Granted, if muscle or skin cells are exposed to cold enough air, they too will die. Frostbite, for example, is a condition in which freezing temperatures cause skin cells to die. But CoolSculpting doesn't cause frostbite, nor does it harm your skin or muscle cells in any other way. It uses cool air at a precise temperature to induce localized death in fat cells without damaging your skin or muscle cells.

With CoolSculpting, you can expect to lose about 25% of the fat in the targeted area. Keep in mind, however, that you can have multiple CoolSculpting sessions performed on the same area of your body to increase percentage of fat lost.

What Happens to Fat During CoolSculpting?

During a CoolSculpting session, an applicator will be placed on the skin of your targeted area, at which point the applicator will pull your skin while simultaneously exposing it to cold air. It's a quick and easy process that typically takes just 45 to 60 minutes.

 

What Happens to Fat Cells After CoolSculpting?

After being exposed to the cold air created by the applicator, the targeted fat cells will begin to die. What does this mean exactly? When the fat cells die, they'll begin to break down, eventually being absorbed into the bloodstream and expelled through urine.

Research has shown that dead fat cells are naturally processed in the body by a special type of white blood cells. As part of the immune system, white blood cells are designed to defend against foreign invaders by attacking and neutralizing them.

However, dead fat cells are also processed by white blood cells.  After your CoolSculpting procedure, your body's white blood cells will find and process the targeted, dead fat cells by absorbing them into your bloodstream.

When the dead fat cells are in your bloodstream, they'll eventually reach your liver. According to UPMC, the human liver is capable of filtering about 1.4 liters of blood per minute. At any given time, about 10% of your body's total blood is stored in the liver. Of course, the liver's function is filter waste from the blood. As it filters dead fat cells -- as well as other waste -- it separates them from the blood.

This waste is known as urea, which is essentially the main compound of urine. Therefore, the dead, targeted fat cells in CoolSculpting are eventually expelled by your body in urine. You won't notice when this happens. It's all part of your body's methodology for disposing of waste, including dead fat cells.

Will The Fat Cells Return?

Once the fat cells have been expelled by your body, they won't return. With that said, you can still develop new fat cells in the targeted area. If you eat the wrong foods and/or don't get enough exercise, for example, there's a good chance new fat cells will form in the same area.

For the best results, you must adjust your lifestyle to ensure that you aren't consuming too many excess calories.

It's not necessarily the amount of dietary fat you consume that affects your body fat. Rather, it's the number of calories that you consume. Calories that your body doesn't use or burn are often stored as fat.

Your body will tap into these fat reserves as a source of back-up energy. But if you consuming too many calories, fat will accumulate without being burned.

So, while the fat cells targeted with CoolSculpting won't return, you may develop new fat cells in the same area if you consume an excess number of calories. If you're hoping to retain your newly sculpted body, you must evaluate your diet and fitness regimens. Just remember to watch your calorie intake while ensuring that you get an adequate amount of daily exercise.

Why CoolSculpting Is Such an Effective Fat-Reduction Procedure

CoolSculpting is a highly effective fat-reduction procedure because it's able to permanently eliminate 25% of all fat cells in the targeted area without requiring surgical incisions or other invasive processes. Many people assume liposuction is the only viable answer to unwanted body fat. While liposuction can certainly work for some individuals, it's a more complex procedure with a greater risk of complication. CoolSculpting, on the other hand, is both safe and effective.

Using a handheld applicator device, CoolSculpting can target your body fat with cool air to induce localized death. The fat cells will gradually die, at which point they'll be absorbed into your bloodstream and filtered by your liver.

Your body will then expel the fat cells in urine. Hopefully, this gives you a better idea as to what happens to fat cells in CoolSculpting.

Want to learn more about CoolSculpting? Request a free consultation with Radiance Medspa today!

What Parts of the Body Can CoolSculpting Target?

Can't seem to get rid of stubborn body fat? Well, you aren't alone. Millions of men and women in the United States struggle with unwanted body fat. While exercising and dieting can help, it's not always enough to overcome genetics or hormones. CoolSculpting, however, offers a safe and effective way to eliminate unwanted body fat once and for all. But unless you're familiar with this body contouring procedure, you might be wondering which parts of the body it can target.

Flanks

The flanks, or what's more commonly known as love handles, is one of the most common areas targeted by CoolSculpting. In September 2010, The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved CoolSculpting for the reduction of fat in the flanks. Since then, countless men and women have sought the procedure to eliminate fat in their flanks. If you have excess fat on the sides of your lower stomach, you should consider CoolSculpting. Of course, the flanks are just one of many parts of the body on which you can have CoolSculpting performed. This popular noninvasive procedure can reduce fat in several other parts of the body, which are mentioned below.

Abdomen

In addition to flanks, CoolSculpting can also target the abdomen. Also known as simply as the belly, the abdomen is a problematic source of body fat for millions of men and women. While fat can accumulate in any area of the body, it occurs most frequently in the abdomen. The good news is CoolSculpting can shrink your abdomen by significantly reducing fat in this area of your body. Even though the FDA initially approved CoolSculpting specifically for the reduction of fat in the flanks, the FDA later gave the procedure the green light to target the abdomen. Therefore, you can rest assured knowing that CoolSculpting is a safe and effective way to reduce fat in your abdomen.

Under the Chin

You can even use CoolSculpting to reduce unwanted fat under your chin. Known as the submental area, the procedure can help you achieve a slimmer and more contoured jawline by freezing problematic fat cells. It's difficult to eliminate fat under the chin through dieting and exercising alone. Most people will burn fat in common areas like their stomach first, meaning the fat under their chin will remain. To make matters worse, fat under the chin is more visible than excess fat in other areas of the body.

To put the problem of under-the-chin fat into perspective, a survey conducted by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery found that nearly three-quarters of Americans have unwanted fat under their chin. If this sounds familiar, you should check out CoolSculpting. After just a single session, you can achieve a more contoured jawline with significantly less visible fat.

Although it's primarily sought for the reduction of fat, CoolSculpting has been approved by the FDA to improve the appearance of lax tissue under the chin. In one study, 77% of clients reported improved results after using CoolSculpting on their lax tissue. In other words, CoolSculpting isn't just effective at reducing fat under the chin; it's effective at dealing with the dreaded "double chin." When lax tissue is creating the appearance of a double chin, CoolSculpting can help contour and shape it.

Thighs

If the fat on your thighs won't seem to go away, perhaps CoolSculpting is the answer. Of course, there are other ways to reduce thigh fat, such as a thigh lift. During a thigh lift, a cosmetic surgeon will remove excess fat and skin from the thighs. Because it requires incisions, though, a thigh lift is an invasive procedure. As a result, it has more risks as well as a longer recovery time. A thigh lift is still an effective way to reduce thigh fat, but you'll probably need to take at least seven to 10 days off work to recover from it.

CoolSculpting, on the other hand, is a noninvasive procedure that doesn't require incisions. An aesthetician can target unwanted fat on your thighs using a CoolSculpting applicator. When the applicator is applied to your thighs, it will freeze the fat cells at a low temperature without harming your skin or muscle tissue. When the session is over, you can go back to your daily activities. Unlike a thigh lift, CoolSculpting is a noninvasive procedure that doesn't require any downtime for recovery.

Back

The back is another common area of the body targeted by CoolSculpting. While most men and women experience problematic body fat on their flanks or abdomen, some experience it on their back. And when fat begins to accumulate on your back, it can affect your self-confidence. You may find yourself wearing additional layers of clothing, for example, in an attempt to conceal your back fat.

Alternatively, you may stay at home rather than engaging in social activities with friends and family. You can regain your self-confidence and eliminate stubborn back fat, however, through CoolSculpting. It's a proven, FDA-approved procedure for the reduction of back fat.

Banana Rolls

CoolSculpting can target banana rolls as well. What are banana rolls exactly? Banana rolls are rolls of fat between the buttocks and thigh. They are called "banana rolls" because they resemble the shape of a banana. A banana roll is essentially a double crease below the buttocks. Rather than running parallel to each other, the bottom crease rises on the side to connect with the top crease. In doing so, the two creases create the shape of a banana.

Not everyone suffers from banana rolls. For the millions of people who have banana rolls, though, it's often a driving factor for low self-confidence. If you have banana rolls, you may wear shorts to the beach or pool rather than your favorite bikini.

But like the other areas mentioned in this blog post, CoolSculpting can target banana rolls. The CoolSculpting applicator will freeze the fat cells directly below your buttocks. Once frozen, the fat cells will die, resulting in a more contoured body without the presence of banana rolls.

Armpits

Finally, CoolSculpting can significantly reduce fat around the armpits. Also known as bra bulge, excessive armpit fat is a common condition from which millions of women suffer. As fat accumulates in the bra area, it may bulge out. This is particularly true when wearing certain types of clothes, such as tight dresses, shirts or tops. The excessive fat in this area essentially pushes its way out to create a bulge around the armpits.

You can use CoolSculpting to reduce bra bulge fat. Using the CoolSculpting applicator, an aesthetician can target excess fat around your bra area to eliminate bra bulge and, therefore, help you achieve a slimmer and more contoured appearance.

Whether you have unwanted fat in your flanks, abdomen, below your chink, back, thighs, banana rolls or armpits, you should consider CoolSculpting. This noninvasive procedure has been approved by the FDA to target fat in all these areas of the body.

And because it's noninvasive, it won't disrupt your normal activities. Just remember to talk with your aesthetician and let him or her know which areas of your body you want to target. Only then will you get the best possible results from CoolSculpting.

Want to learn more about CoolSculpting? Request a free consultation today!

Does Coolsculpting Cause Frostbite?

After reading about how CoolSculpting works, you might be wondering whether this noninvasive cosmetic procedure causes frostbite. Conventional wisdom may lead you to believe that the cold temperatures needed to freeze and shrink your fat cells may also freeze your skin. And since your skin is your body's first line of defense against infection-causing bacteria […]

How Does CoolSculpting Work?

How CoolSculpting Works is through a process called Cryolipolysis, or what's more commonly known by its brand name CoolSculpting, has become one of the most popular nonsurgical treatments for the reduction of body fat.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASAPS), nearly a half-million CoolSculpting procedures have been performed worldwide. Considering that it's still a relatively new treatment -- first introduced into the United States in 2010 -- this statistic attests to its popularity.

Of course, there are other treatments available to reduce body fat, including both surgical and nonsurgical procedures. As a result, you might be skeptical of CoolSculpting and whether it really works. In short, CoolSculpting does, in fact, reduce body fat. To better understand how it's able to remove unwanted fat from your body, though, you must first understand the basics of this increasingly popular procedure.

What Is CoolSculpting?

CoolSculpting is a nonsurgical procedure that involves the use of a vacuum machine to freeze fat in select areas of the body. It was pioneered by Zeltiq Aesthetics during the mid-2000s. In 2010, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave Zeltiq Aesthetics the green light to market its innovative new procedure as a treatment for fat on the sides of the body.

Later, in 2012, CoolSculpting was approved by the FDA for the removal of stomach fat as well. Zeltiq Aesthetics has since been acquired by the Irish pharmaceutical company Allergan, but CoolSculpting is still offered by select aestheticians, including Radiance Medspa Atlanta -- and it's only becoming more popular.

Does CoolSculpting Really Work?

It absolutely works! According to a study published in the U.S. National Library of Medicine, CoolSculpting reduces fat in the targeted area by approximately 20.4% after two months and 25.5% after six months. In other words, CoolSculpting doesn't just offer a temporary reduction of body fat. It offers long-lasting results that aren't found in other fat-reduction procedures. This is because CoolSculpting destroys the targeted fat cells, ensuring that they don't come back.

It's import to note that CoolSculpting isn't designed for weight loss. Rather, it's a body contouring procedure that's used to reduce body fat. If you have one or more areas of your body where fat is a problem, you should consider scheduling a consultation for CoolSculpting. It's a safe and effective alternative to liposuction that can reduce the concentration of fat in targeted areas by up to 25%.

Woman Wondering How Does CoolSculpting Work?

How CoolsSculpting Works: What You Need to Know

CoolSculpting works by using cold to destroy problematic fat cells. During a typical procedure, an aesthetician will first apply gel to your skin. Next, he or she will place a vacuum machine, known as an applicator, to the targeted area. The applicator then draws the fat into its hollow interior where it's chilled using cool air. When this occurs, you may feel a slight numbness or tingling sensation in the targeted area. But after a few minutes, these minor side effects should subside.

The applicator is the primary machine used to perform CoolSculpting. It features a wand-like attachment that's placed directly over the targeted area of your body. Once in place, the applicator will suction your body fat into a tube, which is where the magic happens. The applicator will then blow cool air over your skin to freeze the underlying fat cells.

For CoolSculpting to work, fat cells must be exposed to a temperature of 39 degrees to 41 degrees Fahrenheit. At this temperature range, fat cells will die without risking damage or cellular death to skin or muscle tissue. Going back to the basics of chemistry 101, cold causes things to contract. Therefore, CoolSculpting will cause the immediate shrinkage of fat cells, soon followed by the death of those targeted cells.

You'll probably notice a reduction of body fat in the targeted areas after just a few weeks. However, the full results of CoolSculpting typically occur after two months. By two months, the targeted fat cells will die. While a single session will yield noticeable results, you can have additional CoolSculpting sessions for even greater results.

CoolSculpting can be performed on most areas of the body where there's a high concentration of fat. The makers of this procedure have a motto: "If you can squeeze it, you can freeze it." Whether you're looking to reduce fat on your stomach, sides, arms, back or elsewhere, you should consider CoolSculpting. It works for any area of the body where you can squeeze the fat.

You can expect a typical CoolSculpting session to last for 35 to 75 minutes. After the cooling process has been performed, the aesthetician will perform kneed the targeted areas of your body to further improve the results. During the procedure, you can relax while reading a book, using your smartphone or by watching TV. Some people even use this opportunity to take a nap. When the CoolSculpting procedure is finished, you go back to your daily life. Since it doesn't damage your skin or muscle tissue, there's no downtime for recovery with CoolSculpting.

Will CoolSculpting Work for Me?

Because it's a noninvasive and nonsurgical procedure, CoolSculpting will work for most men and women who are looking to reduce their body fat. With that said, it shouldn't be used as a treatment for obesity or weight gain. Neither CoolSculpting nor any procedure should be used as a substitute for dieting and exercising. If you are trying to lose weight, focus on dieting and exercising. If you're looking to reduce the amount of fat in specific areas of your body, on the other hand, CoolSculpting is the answer.

The key thing to remember is that CoolSculpting is a body-contouring procedure, so it won't necessarily make you lose weight. It uses cold air to freeze fat cells, thus causing cellular destruction of body fat. With its precise temperature of 39 degrees to 41 degrees Fahrenheit, the surrounding skin and muscle tissue will remain healthy and unharmed. You may look visibly slimmer in targeted areas, but CoolSculpting won't have any noticeable impact on your weight.

According to the ASAPS, men and women suffering from cold-related medical conditions shouldn't seek CoolSculpting. If you currently suffer from cryoglobulinemia, paroxysmal cold hemoglobulinuria or cold urticaris, you should talk to your primary care physician beforehand. He or she can advise you on whether or not you are a suitable candidate for CoolSculpting. But as long as you don't suffer from any cold-related medical condition -- and you aren't overweight or obese -- you should be an ideal candidate for this fat-reduction procedure.

The Bottom Line on How CoolSculpting Works

CoolSculpting is an FDA-approved procedure for the reduction of body fat. It works by freezing fat cells until the point of destruction but without harming the skin or surrounding tissue. An aesthetician will use an applicator that suctions the targeted body fat into a small tube where it's exposed to cool air. As the temperature of the air inside the tube drops, the fat cells begin to shrink and die.

There are other noninvasive procedures available to reduce body fat, some of which include the use of radio frequency and laser light. However, most of these procedures are more expensive than CoolSculpting and offer poorer results. For the permanent reduction of body fat, you can't go wrong with CoolSculpting. It's been approved by the FDA for this purpose, so you can rest assured knowing that it really works.

Want to learn more about CoolSculpting? Request a free consultation today!

A Common Antioxidant Is Shown to Actually Reverse Signs of Aging in Skin

Original Article By Brittany Fallon


We're always searching for the "fountain of youth," whether it's in lotions, potions or in-office treatments that claim to turn back the hands of time. Researchers are hard at work trying to figure out the secret to slowing skin aging, and with each report that gets published, they get closer and closer.

One of the latest reports to spark some buzz in the anti-aging arena comes from researchers at the University of Maryland and was published in Scientific Reports this week. Their findings might surprise you: a chemical called methylene blue—it's actually an antioxidant, which makes it sound a lot less scary—that's been used in the medical field for years is now being linked to reducing signs of skin aging like lines and wrinkles by thickening the skin.

In a four-week study conducted on 3-D human skin created from cells of middle-aged subjects, researchers found that the antioxidant "improved skin viability, promoted wound healing, and increased skin hydration and dermis thickness."

Many doctors are excited about these findings and look forward to future science and studies on the subject.

"This is very exciting news!" says Troy, MI, plastic surgeon Anthony Youn, MD. "Antioxidants have long been known to fight free-radical damage, so antioxidants such as vitamin C are an integral component of any anti-aging skin care regimen. However, not all antioxidants are created equal. If it's true that methylene blue may have more powerful antioxidant properties than other more commonly used antioxidants, then it's possible that this ingredient could be added to topical serums and creams to help slow down the aging process. In surgery we often use methylene blue as a dye or stain, so the use of it in an anti-aging role could be new and exciting. As long as the person doesn't end up looking like a Smurf afterward!"

New York dermatologist Estee Williams, MD, adds, "What's intriguing about this molecule is that it is more than just a scavenger of "bad hombre" free radicals (essentially, the definition of an antioxidant)—it was shown to boost levels of collagen and elastin in the deep dermis, which are essential components of skin, without which, wrinkles and sagging ensue. The study is obviously well done and the authors left no stone unturned. It will be interesting to follow their next steps. There's a lot of promise here and the next step will be to translate these effects in vivo for anti-aging applications, as well as dermatological diseases."

Washington, D.C. dermatologist Tina Alster, MD, is also impressed with the results of the study. "This is an exciting addition to current anti-aging research," she says. "I envision that methylene blue will be added to various topicals, including lotions, creams and serums in the near future."

This Is the Age You Should Start Preventative Botox, According to Dermatologists

Original Article By Sarah Kinonen

In today's not-so-shocking news: People are officially interested in injectable, non-invasive treatments. (It's about damn time, folks.) We've recently reported that, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS), an estimated 7 million injection procedures, including Botox, were performed in the last year alone. And that number just continues to rise. According to the experts, they've seen an influx of younger patients opting for preventative treatments sooner rather than later. But how soon is too soon? For the full picture, we reached out to dermatologists across the country to nail down the exact age, if interested, to begin Botox. The takeaway? Whenever you damn well please. Yes — really.

In Your 20s:"My advice to patients is to start to treat lines when they begin to stick around. When you smile or frown, lines may develop during the expression. They generally go away when the face is relaxed. However, when lines start to stick around at rest, that's when you can consider getting initial Botox treatments. I personally feel that Botox is not necessary until those lines start to show at rest. In some people, this may be in the mid-twenties, while in others after 30. It is rare for someone to come in asking for Botox under the age of 25. I've found that there has been a shift in the age of women asking for Botox now, compared to even five years ago. Now more than ever, I have patients coming in asking for Botox in preparation of their thirtieth birthday. A few years ago, it was extremely rare for any woman in her twenties to be considering this option." — Joshua Zeichner, the director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City

"For preventative measures, that typically means prevention of wrinkles. For this, I would have a hard time doing any Botox on a patient younger than 24 or 25 years old, and that would likely be for a patient who squints quite a bit and is at risk for developing the '11' vertical lines over the nose. Even as a write this, I feel a bit shallow and have concerns about having a patient get started on a cosmetic procedure at such a young age without them really understanding the implications." — Miami-based dermatologist and RealSelf contributor Jeffrey Epstein

"The earlier you start Botox, the better since it is best used as a preventative measure to avoid getting fine lines and wrinkles. It works by relaxing the muscle; once relaxed, it relaxes the overlying skin, so you don't get wrinkles. We have a lot of patients in their mid-twenties who start Botox, which is a good age if you have an expressive face and lines." — Debra Jaliman, a New York City-based dermatologist

"The average age of my preventive 'Baby Botox' patients is about 25, but that is not a hard and fast rule. It's just often unnecessary to inject someone earlier for cosmetic reasons. Many facial lines seem to have a genetic or hereditary component, and once a young person starts to see lines that they see in their older relatives, then it's time for Botox. I have not injected anyone under 21 — not for any reason other than the fact that none of my patients younger than 21 have needed or have asked for it. I treat everyone individually, so if someone younger than I'm used to injecting came in asking about forehead lines, I would be open-minded to inject a small dose of Botox." —Amy Wechsler, New York City-based dermatologist

In Your 30s: "Depending on the level of sun damage, the amount of muscle movement, and whether or not the person has "Resting Bitch Face," all of these factors play into the decision at which age to start using Botox. So, if there was a strong frown, it may be appropriate to start as early as 20. If not so much, 30 — at the latest 35. Recent studies have shown that too much mobility in the muscles does lead to premature wrinkling." —Ava Shamban, a Beverly Hills-based dermatologist and founder of SkinxFive

"The earliest I've done Botox [on someone] is in the mid-twenties, and that's if someone is genetically predisposed to wrinkles on the face. Or sometimes I've also seen a person at that age who was constantly frowning and that was a good reason to do the treatment. In general, for prophylaxis, if someone is taking care of their skin I recommend Botox starting in their thirties." — Paul Nassif, a Los Angeles-based plastic surgeon, RealSelf contributor, and star of E!'s Botched

In Your 40s: "The most appropriate age to start Botox will depend on the skin color and the type of lifestyle (more versus less sun). In general, Caucasian women (who were not lifeguards) usually do best when they start Botox between 35 and 40. If they were a lifeguard, maybe 30. For darker skin tones, the appropriate age to start Botox tends a bit higher, more like 40 to 45, but it will also depend on the circumstances. If someone has gotten a lot of sun exposure or their lifestyle is harder on the skin (i.e. smoker, lives in high altitudes, etc.), then it could be earlier. The chronologic age to start Botox is often irrelevant. It is more important to look at the dynamic wrinkles themselves. When the movement wrinkles on the upper part of the face start to linger after the movement has stopped — like seeing crow's feet but not smiling — that's the best time to start treatments." — Elizabeth Tanzi, founder and director of Capital Laser & Skin Care and associate clinical professor, department of dermatology at the George Washington University Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

The Juvéderm Vollure XC Filler Has Just Been Approved by the FDA

Original Article By Sarah Kinonen


While cosmetic enhancements, such as fillers and Botox, are still (unfortunately) considered taboo in today's society, surprisingly, the number of people getting work done is going up and up. In fact, in 2015, Americans were injected more than 6.6 million times, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, which is a whopping 40 percent increase from five years ago. And now, those 6 million and counting have one more option to consider when booking their next appointment, as the FDA just approved a brand-new filler: Juvéderm Vollure XC.

Allergan, the pharmaceutical company that owns Juvéderm, just announced its newest hyaluronic acid dermal filler, Juvéderm Vollure XC, which has been approved for the correction of "moderate to severe facial wrinkles and folds, such as nasolabial folds," according to a statement made by the company. What's more is that this filler, made for those over 21, is said to last as long as 18 months — a full year longer than other injectables on the market.

In a clinical trial for the injectable, 59 percent of participants saw improvement in smile lines around the mouth for up to 18 months, and at the same time, 82 percent of patients said they were satisfied with results at six months, while 68 percent were still pleased at eight months. Sounds great, but how does it work? We tapped New York City dermatologist Joshua Zeichner for more on the technology behind the filler.

Juvéderm Vollure XC uses special technology, known as Vycross — which is also used in Juvéderm Voluma XC and Juvéderm Volbella XC — to hold the hyaluronic acid together into a cohesive gel, which keeps it intact after it's injected into the skin, explains Zeichner. "Vollure XC's Vycross technology links both high and low molecular-weight hyaluronic acid, while Juvederm's Hylacross technology uses various degrees of cross-linking of mainly high molecular weight hyaluronic acid."

In non-plastic surgeon speak, that means that the mixture of high and low hyaluronic acid in the Vycross technology creates a more connected gel, which can be molded, effectively lifting sunken skin sitting above it. "Vollure sits in that sweet spot where it is firm enough to fill the line, but soft enough to move naturally with facial expression," says Zeichner. Another major difference between Juvéderm and the new Juvéderm Vollure XC is that the new formula produces minimal swelling, which means shorter recovery time. "The gel also may last longer than other products, making it a better value for the price and the need for fewer injection sessions," says Zeichner.

8 Simple Ways to Detox Your Body

Original Article By Ysolt Usigan

Cut Your Sugar Intake
A seasonal detox is an effective way to clear your body of toxins, which will also speed up your metabolism and enhance your overall health. Start by decreasing the amount of sugar you consume, says Matt Dower, spa director at Mirbeau Inn & Spa in Skaneateles, NY. And that includes honey, molasses, and artificial sweeteners.

"If you eat more sugar, you ask your body for more insulin, straining your pancreas and wearing yourself out," he says. "In the long term, this kind of habit can cause you to become chronically fatigued, diabetic, develop cancer, and pack on excess weight."

Start with Water Dower also suggests you drink a tall glass of water with juice from half of a lemon in the morning. "Lemon helps re-hydrate the system and promotes digestion, which will help the flow of waste out of your body," he says.

Move Your Body
Regular exercise encourages circulation in the blood and lymph system, Dower says. Doing so will also enhance digestion, reduce tension, lubricate joints, and strengthen your body. It's a proven fact. "People who exercise regularly have far fewer total toxins in their systems," he points out.

Drink a Lot of Tea "Not only is tea full of antioxidants, it hydrates you (especially if it's herbal) and fills you up," says Ashley Karr, a research psychologist and wellness coach. "This means you will be less likely to overeat or eat the wrong things!" Keep in mind, the caffeine in tea is different than the caffeine in coffee—it's gentler on your system. It'll also give you a pick-me-up minus the jitters.

Eat Organic
Chad Sarno, research and development chef for Whole Foods' Health Starts Here initiative suggests you reconfigure your diet this year. "A colorful variety of fruits and veggies should be the main focus of your diet, along with whole grains, beans and legumes, and small amounts of nuts and seeds," he says.

You should eat whole plant foods because processed foods lack the nutrients your body needs. Dark green vegetables, for instance, are full of micronutrients and are very low in calories, so you can eat a lot of them.

Combat Environmental Pollutants
Don't forget that pollution and allergens are all around you. They're in the air and can trigger allergy symptoms (such as yucky, puffy, red eyes). Dr. Travis Stork, host of daytime talk show The Doctors advises you flush your nasal passages regularly with a Neti Pot. Doing so can eliminate the side effects of air pollutants and lead to better breathing naturally. If you use the Neti Pot before bed, even better—it will enhance your sleep.

Sweat It Out in a Sauna
Forbes Riley, creator of fitness product SpinGym who you may also remember co-hosting Jack LaLanne's juicer infomercial, is a big fan of detoxing. It's how she lost her pregnancy weight gain at the age of 42 after giving birth to twins. She suggests you use a sauna regularly. "There's nothing more detoxing than sweating it out," she says.

Exfoliate "Skin brushing and oil massages will help exfoliate the toxins from your skin and refresh circulation," says Christina Chodos, a certified health counselor and educator from Chicago, IL.